Where and when can I get the vaccine at Lafayette?

Bailey Health Center has partnered with Pfizer Pharmaceutical and CVS to make it easier than ever to get vaccinated for this strain of meningitis. On March 13th, our partners are coming to Farinon Student Center to vaccinate students that aren’t protected against meningococcal B.

Forms must be filled out and returned to the Bailey Health Center by March 6th.

Download the Registration Form
Read more information about the event

I already got meningitis shots from my doctor at home as a teenager. Do I still need to get this MenB shot?

Yes, you still need to get this new shot. The MenB shots are NEW vaccines (called Trumenba) approved in late 2014-early 2015. They cover meningococcal serogroup B, while the previous meningitis shots (called Menactra, Menveo or Menomune) cover serogroup A, C, W & Y. Those diseases are also very serious, so please be sure your last booster for those shots was at age 16 or later. You will not have protection against the MenB disease unless you get the new MenB shots.

Who is considered at risk of Meningitis B?

The target population considered to be at most risk are younger UCSB students, especially new students coming to the campus for the first time. Our previous cases occurred in undergraduates living in shared residences, and members of sports teams and Greek organizations. Older persons have much less risk, although cases do rarely occur in any age group.

Who can get the vaccine?

It is licensed for use in the U.S.A. by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for persons aged 10-25 years of age, except in an outbreak setting where the CDC recently recommended the vaccine be given with no upper age limit.

Registered students can obtain the vaccine from the Bailey Health Center. The FDA has approved both vaccines for those up to age 26. For students over 26 it is considered “off-label” but can be administered after consultation with your medical provider.

Community members, staff and faculty are encouraged to consult their private clinicians to determine if they should get the vaccine. Persons with conditions that compromise their immunity, especially persons who have complement component deficiencies (e.g., C5-C9, properdin, factor H, factor D, or taking Soliris®) or absence of their spleen.

Can I wait until the next time I go home to get the MenB shots? What is the urgency for getting the shots now?

We do not recommend any delays in obtaining the new MenB vaccines, because the highest risk of disease occurs when new students are exposed to the meningococcal bacteria for the first time when they arrive in a new environment. The majority of adult cases have occurred at age 18 years.

Unfortunately, the meningococcal bacteria may still be present in students who have had the vaccine, so they can pass it to others even though they are protected from the disease. The best way for students to protect themselves is to receive the full series of the new MenB vaccines (2 doses of Trumenba, 6 months apart).

Is it a live vaccine?

No, it is made of recombinant protein components. It is believed to be safe for use in immunocompromised persons.

Does the vaccine contain mercury?

No mercury is contained in the vaccine.

Can I get it at the same time as other vaccines?

YES, we believe it is safe to get multiple vaccines at the same time if needed, based on experience with other vaccines that work in different ways. Clinical studies have been done with Trumenba® and Gardasil® (HPV vaccine) given simultaneously, and found no decrease in effectiveness of either vaccine. Other vaccine interactions have not been studied.

How many shots are needed for full protection against MenB disease?

For Trumenba®, a series of 2 shots given six months apart are needed to provide maximum immunity.

Although some protection is achieved after the first shot, studies have shown this response soon wanes, and it is very important to complete the series in order to develop full and longer lasting protection against disease.

If I can’t get the shots exactly on schedule, will that be a problem?

NO, the vaccine still works if the intervals between the shots have to be extended longer than the recommended follow-up doses. However, the fastest protection will be achieved by adhering to the schedule.

What are side effects?

Most commonly reported is sore arm at the site of the injection. Extensive testing in clinical trials was presented to FDA who approved the widespread use of the vaccines.

How much does it cost?

For this event, billing will take place CVS and your insurance.

After the event the vaccine will be available at the Bailey Health Center at a cost of $125 per injection. A student’s account can be billed directly and receipt provided for reimbursement with your insurance

Where can I get additional information?

For more information see the links on the Student Health Center’s MenB page.